Tag Archives: research

New study on how the responsible gambling tool Playscan is used

In the article “Usage of a responsible Gambling tool: a descriptive analysis and latent class analysis of user behavior” PhD student David Forsström from the Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, studied how players are using Playscan. He examined the Playscan 3-data of 9 528 online gamblers who used the tool voluntarily and investigated if there are different subclasses of users by conducting a latent class analysis. He observed number of visits to the site, self-tests made and advice used.

 

The study has shown that the tool has a high initial usage and a low repeated usage. Latent class analysis yielded five distinct classes of users: self-testers, multi-function users, advice users, site visitors, and non-users. Multinomial regression revealed that classes were associated with different risk levels of excessive gambling. The self-testers and multi-function users used the tool to a higher extent and were found to have a greater risk of excessive gambling than the other classes.

 

Professor Per Carlbring states, “The low usage of the tool is not a disappointment. As long as the right ones actually use the tool, which is exactly what we found. People with a higher risk level are using Playscan more.”

 

Find the study here

Playscan has a proven positive impact on at-risk players

PRESS RELEASE
Göteborg, Sweden 2015-07-08

A new research study just published in the journal International Gambling Studies showed that at-risk players who received behavioral feedback via Playscan were significantly more likely to reduce the amounts of money they deposited and wagered – compared with players who did not use Playscan.

The authors, Dr Richard Wood and Dr Michael Wohl, conducted the first study of this kind to use actual behavioral data, from 1,558 Internet players in a real-life setting.

“This is a relatively new area of investigation in the responsible gambling field, but our results suggest that such a tool can be very useful to help at-risk players keep better control over their gambling expenditure,” said Dr Richard Wood.

“The study provides empirical evidence, that helping players to better understand their gambling behavior has a sound practical application as a responsible gambling strategy,” added Dr Wohl.

The research provides valuable insight into how a well-designed player-tool, such as Playscan, can be utilized to ensure players have a more responsible gambling experience.

Playscan is thrilled to have been part of the study and to contribute to a better understanding of how to support responsible play.

 

Access the full research report here

For more information about the study, contact:
Dr. Richard Wood at info@gamres.org

Players benefit from using Playscan

 

Playscan 3 helps at-risk players to reduce their spending on gambling.

A previous evaluation determined that players found Playscan to be a useful tool (Griffiths, Wood & Parke, 2009), but a systematic investigation of whether the tool influences players’ gambling behaviours had yet to be conducted. To address this gap we, Dr Richard Wood from GamRes Limited, Canada and Dr Michael Wohl from Carleton University, Canada, undertook an independent evaluation study the previous version, Playscan 3.

 

 

Specifically, we set out to empirically test the hypothesis that ‘The gambling behavior of players who use Playscan, will show a significant observable change, following the presentation of a negative change in risk category (i.e. Green to Yellow or Yellow to Red). In other words, we tested the idea that using Playscan can help players maintain, or return to, less risky patterns of play.

 

How was the study conducted?


Player data was examined for 1558 Swedish Internet players (n = 1388 male; n = 170 female). More males were present in the sample due to the data being drawn from a population that had a predominance of online poker players. Poker is a game that has a higher proportion of male versus female players. Six hundred and ninety four Playscan subscribers were compared to the same number of non-Playscan subscribers. The two groups of players were matched in terms of age, gender, gambling intensity, types of games played and current Playscan risk rating.

All players in the study were rated by Playscan, but only Playscan subscribers received feedback about their playing behaviour. This meant that everything else being equal, any changes in behaviour following feedback from Playscan would suggest that it was having an impact.

 

What did the evaluation study conclude?


It was found that Playscan subscribers who were informed that their rating was ‘Yellow’ (at-risk for gambling problems) showed a significant reduction in the amount of money deposited and wagered, compared to those players who did not use Playscan. This reduction in spending for at-risk players, was seen one week after enrolment with Playscan and was also evident 24 weeks after enrolment.

 

Based on the results, Wood and Wohl concluded that there is evidence to suggest Playscan is particularly helpful for Yellow players (those who show signs of risky play). That is, the feedback provided by Playscan, to those who show signs of risky play, was shown to reduce their levels of spending on gambling games tracked by Playscan. As such, Playscan appears to have responsible gambling utility – at least for those who are most at-risk for developing problematic patterns of play. Importantly, Red players (those who show signs of problematic play) enrolled in Playscan also reduced their expenditure on play, but so did Red players not enrolled in Playscan.

One explanation for this is that Red players, in both groups, may be more aware of a need to reduce their spending on games, as their playing is more obviously risky. Nevertheless, Red players who were using Playscan would have benefitted additionally from being given information to help them seek out the treatment or support that they may have required.