Making big data actionable by creating user personas

Talk by Natalia Matulewicz at the New Horizons in Responsible Gambling Conference February 2-4, 2015

What do you know about your online player? With anonymous players, customer data is an important factor when making strategic business decisions with limited information. However, big data often becomes a faceless collection of information, rather than a true picture of the players’ wants and needs. One still needs to know how to interpret data and how to combine it with other sources of information.

User Personas brings together big data with qualitative user research such as interviews, field studies and observations to gain an overall picture of a user, their needs, goals and motivation. It also fills the gap between what players claim to act upon compared to their measured actions, which in the context of gambling often differs. Combined with big data, User Personas give the answers to three important questions: what are the main target groups, which target groups should be focused on to make the most impact, and how should communications be designed towards those target groups?

What does the gambling industry know about increased risk players?

 

A while ago we attended a meeting with the customer relations marketing (CRM) team at a gambling company. The team had been working on creating customer segmentations, which within marketing is one well-used idea.
The concept refers to creating groups of people with common behaviors and characteristics that you want to reach with messages or offers. The team we met had done a careful segmentation based on money, game types and combination of games people play and demographics.

 

The head of this project explained that they had identified one segment of players that they chose to call the “high spenders” and that is obviously where most the high-risk players could be found. They continued telling us how they work on helping that group by unsubscribing them from all promotional marketing campaigns.

 

From a responsible gambling perspective this is a reasonable and logical course of action. Not to encouraging a player with risky behavior to gamble more. But the team looked at us and asked: is it really fair to stop sending promotions after just one week in the high-risk zone? What if the high-risk behavior is just a coincidence? Maybe some of these players have saved up some money to gamble, lets say, during The World Cup?

 

The CRM team had raised a very interesting question: When is the appropriate time to intervene?

 

INTERVENTION AT THE RIGHT TIME 

It is true that we find a lot of high-risk players in the high spenders segment. They are a frequently discussed topic at conferences and in research. And the industry is taking great leaps in their work with responsible gambling by offering tools like help and support for these players: self-exclusion, panic-buttons, contact information to help lines and support groups, educated customer support team and so on.

 

The point is that players do not become high-risk players over night.

It is often a long process of escalating behavior and change in attitude, which includes increased tolerance towards gambling.

 

We believe that the key is to meet the needs of a player early on, before they turn high risk and it becomes a problem. The goal should be to figure out what we can do for the increased risk players – so that reactive tools like self-exclusion and blocked marketing are not to be needed in the first place.

 

MOST PLAYERS ARE NORMAL PLAYERS

Chances are that you, much like us, are used to hearing about the big group of normal or low risk players and a small group of high-risk players. Many of the high-risk players are hard to reach with warnings of risky behavior because of the probability that they can’t bring themselves to care about the consequences of that behavior. For these players, offering hands-on actions is more effective and helpful.

 

However, what comes to mind is that we need to keep the low risk players at low risk. We try to inform them, enlighten them, provide them with tools and educate them all about this thing called gambling problems.

 

The problem is that most people are not that interested in talking about what could become a problem – in fact; it is really difficult for humans in general to relate to a “potential problem”. We want normal players to take part of this important information about responsible gambling but at the same time we do not want to scare them away from our gambling site. What makes this really difficult and complex is that normal players are there to play and enjoy themselves and setting limits or reading about problem gambling simply is not that entertaining.

 

So, we have a big group of low risk players that are not truly interested in responsible gambling. And then we have the high risk ones who are already at high risk. What to do? Well, lets look into what happens in-between when the player is at low risk and the moment they turn high risk.

 

Again: players do not become high risk over night.

 

There are more than enough chances to intervene.

 

PREVENTION IS ABOUT GETTING THROUGH BEFORE

Most of the low risk players do have a positive attitude towards responsible gambling tools – they don’t really mind setting a limit for time or money. But as mentioned, they do not necessarily see why they should put their time into it. However, somewhere along the line of a player going from normal to high-risk their level of interest and activity goes up. Some get curious, some get concerned and some just want to know more.

 

And, in fact, we do see that these players are just as active as the high-risk ones. They click around in the interface, examine every bit of information, complete self tests, setup limits, answer surveys and so on. Here is our chance to meet that curiosity, to face their concerns, to provide answers to their questions.

 

Also, this is the group that most urgently needs prevention. It is important to keep in mind that the increased risk player is not necessarily a problematic gambler. In many cases these are the customers an Operator wants. They are active, they are engaged and they play a lot. They are good for business – as long as they stay out of high-risk zone.

 

MEET JOHNNY AND WILMA

One way of understanding the increased risk players is to look into their risk behavior and how it changes over time.

 

Let us explain by introducing Johnny. He is a young, easy-going person that recently started playing online-poker. And he likes it, he likes it a lot. He is learning the rules quickly and winning more and more games. Increasing his bets. Playing longer hours. Staying up late at night. His risk level goes up in just a few weeks.

 

Johnny is not familiar with problematic gambling. He has heard stories of people gambling away their homes, kid’s savings accounts, employers money but that wouldn’t happen to him, right? Johnny would most likely say that he doesn’t have any negative feelings about his gambling.

 

So what does Johnny need? He needs to become aware and convinced about the risk that is associated with his gambling behavior. Exposure of the information is crucial since Johnny is unlikely to search for it himself, he simply does not know what to look for.

 

She knows that she has spent more money on gambling than she ever intended to. Late nights with bingo, long sessions with lottery ticket after lottery ticket. One day she decided that enough is enough and her risk level decreased.

 

What does Wilma need? Well, one thing that Wilma probably does not need is to begin receiving promotions, bonuses and commercials from her gaming company once again.

 

IT IS A COMPLEX ISSUE

The Operator’s marketing team sends out a message that gambling is fun. The selling point being a moment of entertainment, or a dream of the next big jackpot, or the skill of betting on the winning team. But at the same time responsible gambling means taking into consideration that too much of that fun can lead to problems for some players. A marketing message that is appropriate for a low risk player might backfire if the player has an increased risk. The same goes for a promotional banner on the operator’s game site or an appealing headline in a promotional e-mail.

 

We know a lot about the high-risk player, but now we must challenge ourselves to get to know the increased risk player.

 

A first step is to take into consideration the player’s risk level in all forms of communication, throughout all communication channels and within all touch points where a player meets the gaming operator. To succeed with that, the increased and high-risk players cannot stay a headache of the CSR-department alone. The risk level must influence the whole chain within the organization, from game design, marketing and user experience to management and business development all the way to customer support.

 

So, what was our answer to the CRM team that day? Simply this: That in some cases, they should stop sending promotions even before they turn high risk.

prevention_playscan

Players do not become high risk overnight and there are more than enough chances to intervene

 

 

New features in Playscan 4.2: consumption history

User research shows that players are concerned about keeping their gambling under control. An important aid for that is to let the player know how much time and money he or she spends on gambling. Playscan’s new feature will help players keep track of their spending by presenting charts on actual consumption of time and money.

 

Players can view their results, time spent, and monetary transactions on gambling and directly see patterns and trends. This allows them to get an aggregated view of their habits, and the opportunity to make informed choices about their gambling.

 

The feature is integrated into Playscan but can also be placed outside of the Playscan interface, as an add-on.

 

– Transparency is the absolute foundation in responsible gambling. Players ask for this information time and again, and it is our obligation to answer. I am pleased to have this feature in Playscan, and I’m thrilled for the positive response we’ve had from operators, says Henrik Hallberg, CTO Playscan AB.

More highlights with Playscan 4.2:

  • Activation page with higher click-through.
  • Simplified navigation.

To learn more, pop us an email

 

A shorter Self Test: Does not increase completion rate

Summary: Shortening the 16 statement Self Test within Playscan yields negligible improvement in completion rates. The length of the test is not a problem; players either drop off during the first couple of questions or complete the test.

 

A recurring concern about Playscan has been that 16 statements to consider in the Self Test may be too many. The player may grow impatient and abort the test, especially since the questions themselves can be sensitive and draining. We investigated whether a shorter introductory test with “gate questions” would increase the completion rate of tests.

 

When a player clicks into the Self Test, an introductory text is displayed. Here, the player is encouraged to consider all gambling, at all gambling sites, during the past three months. The player is then asked to consider 16 statements, one at a time.

 

playscan_selftest1

 

To investigate the usefulness of gate questions, the results from the Self Tests at Svenska Spel between 2014-07-04 and 2014-10-14 were analyzed. Statistics of these are presented below, showing the completion and drop-off rates.

playscan_selftest_drop_off_rate

 

Looking at the numbers, the completion rate is quite satisfactory; in particular 80% web completion. This high number is likely due to the curiosity that brought the player to Playscan in the first place, and the promise of self-assessment at the end of the process. Self tests in general tend to have a higher completion rate than surveys thanks to the intrinsic motivation behind doing them.

 

The majority of the players who drop off do so at the first question. We also see a difference between channels with a 10% drop-off rate on web and 23% on mobile. The higher drop-off on mobile is hardly surprising, given the users’ attention span in the mobile context.

 

Only 10% of the started tests are dropped between question 2 and 16, regardless of channel. Interesting to note is that the drop-off rate declines as the test continues.

 

This leaves us with a clear answer to the question of gate questions. We would have yielded only 4% more completed tests if the test consisted of four statements. This number is hardly worth chasing at the cost of the players spending less time contemplating their gambling habits or missing out on the nuances that the full 16 statements bring.

 

———

 

 

The research done at Playscan is not academically focused, but aimed at practical application.
We are pragmatists, knee deep in data to explore. Our mission is to help prevent problem gambling rather than to study it, so we spend our time chasing preventive effect wherever we sense it.
We value agility and adaptation.
Where the territory is uncharted, our guiding light is curiosity and making a difference. Our data is local. We sometimes see wildly varying player behavior between operators, not necessarily because the players are different, but because contexts and presentations are. We believe that the research community has lots to learn about the importance of things like wording and design, and what we say will often be framed to show this. Our findings reflect the everyday player experience. This is neither universal nor static. It can change and, more importantly, can be changed.
At the same time, we have the deepest respect for formal research and academics. We welcome critique of our findings, and hope that others find inspiration and ideas to bring into the academic world.  We are happy to help, and love to exchange experience and ideas. Give us a call if you would like to help out!

Players benefit from using Playscan

 

Playscan 3 helps at-risk players to reduce their spending on gambling.

A previous evaluation determined that players found Playscan to be a useful tool (Griffiths, Wood & Parke, 2009), but a systematic investigation of whether the tool influences players’ gambling behaviours had yet to be conducted. To address this gap we, Dr Richard Wood from GamRes Limited, Canada and Dr Michael Wohl from Carleton University, Canada, undertook an independent evaluation study the previous version, Playscan 3.

 

 

Specifically, we set out to empirically test the hypothesis that ‘The gambling behavior of players who use Playscan, will show a significant observable change, following the presentation of a negative change in risk category (i.e. Green to Yellow or Yellow to Red). In other words, we tested the idea that using Playscan can help players maintain, or return to, less risky patterns of play.

 

How was the study conducted?


Player data was examined for 1558 Swedish Internet players (n = 1388 male; n = 170 female). More males were present in the sample due to the data being drawn from a population that had a predominance of online poker players. Poker is a game that has a higher proportion of male versus female players. Six hundred and ninety four Playscan subscribers were compared to the same number of non-Playscan subscribers. The two groups of players were matched in terms of age, gender, gambling intensity, types of games played and current Playscan risk rating.

All players in the study were rated by Playscan, but only Playscan subscribers received feedback about their playing behaviour. This meant that everything else being equal, any changes in behaviour following feedback from Playscan would suggest that it was having an impact.

 

What did the evaluation study conclude?


It was found that Playscan subscribers who were informed that their rating was ‘Yellow’ (at-risk for gambling problems) showed a significant reduction in the amount of money deposited and wagered, compared to those players who did not use Playscan. This reduction in spending for at-risk players, was seen one week after enrolment with Playscan and was also evident 24 weeks after enrolment.

 

Based on the results, Wood and Wohl concluded that there is evidence to suggest Playscan is particularly helpful for Yellow players (those who show signs of risky play). That is, the feedback provided by Playscan, to those who show signs of risky play, was shown to reduce their levels of spending on gambling games tracked by Playscan. As such, Playscan appears to have responsible gambling utility – at least for those who are most at-risk for developing problematic patterns of play. Importantly, Red players (those who show signs of problematic play) enrolled in Playscan also reduced their expenditure on play, but so did Red players not enrolled in Playscan.

One explanation for this is that Red players, in both groups, may be more aware of a need to reduce their spending on games, as their playing is more obviously risky. Nevertheless, Red players who were using Playscan would have benefitted additionally from being given information to help them seek out the treatment or support that they may have required.

Playscan analysis in VLTs at Svenska Spel

By Svenska Spel introducing mandatory registered play earlier this year, Playscan was able to provide a higher level of understanding about their VLT (Video Lottery Terminal) players. Players who gamble on a VLT machine in Sweden will now be offered a way to keep track of their gambling habits.

 

– We are very happy to now have Playscan linked to our VLT’s. The tool creates awareness and informs the player about their gambling habits. Also, internally this will improve our overall responsible gambling initiatives, says Zenita Strandänger, CSR-manager Svenska Spel.

 

With Playscan, Svenska Spel will be able to provide players with a risk analysis based on their player behavior. The player can easily access their Playscan risk analysis through both web and mobile.

 

– This will provide Svenska Spel with more statistical information for better decision-making, on top of state of the art player protection says Andreas Holmström, CEO Playscan.

 

To learn more, pop us an email

Can responsibility cut it in the tech world?

Technical innovation is understood as bringing something new to the market and our minds are set to believe that there is a  “technological fix” for every problem. Making new cars can solve problems with pollution; health problems can be solved with new medicine. Even problems with loneliness can be solved through online dating sites.

 

People ask each other constantly, “what is the latest thing?”  Well, nowadays we talk a lot about sustainable innovations. For example, we have been faced with the reality that cars have a negative impact on our environment and we have set out on a mission to create new cars that don’t cause pollution problem. Yet, the question might not be how technology can help us with “quick fixes”. By using an electric car instead of a petrol-powered car, we don’t really change our behaviour or our way of thinking, do we? True innovation would be to re-think transportation in general.

 

The answer to the headline question is therefor: it already has. With current technical advances and innovations, responsible gambling is now making an impact on the user experience. Today, player tracking is being used as a communication portal that communicates with players through a risk perspective.  For the responsible gaming provider this is ground breaking technology, because with player tracking, they have the means to create a sustainable gambling population – however, it is how we use the technology that decides how well we will succeed.

 

The technical advances of responsible gambling already made must be systematically integrated in the mind-set of an Operator; today it is not an aspect of every decision, every move or every marketing strategy. The changing nature of responsible gambling and player tracking solutions is about how it now must work its way into being a natural part of the “customer experience” (which the industry tells us is the most important competitive differentiator) and produce insights for the Operator.

 

The challenge ahead is to find out how a gaming provider can engage the next generation of players without creating a new group of problematic gamblers.

 

The key to success is to focus on what players respond to

You need to get to know your players in order to figure out their needs. This is an old but not out-dated truth. With responsibility in mind, the knowledge of how your players behave could create a conflict between different sectors within the organisation. The tech team is often set out to gather Big Data and when the data has been contextualized into information, the obvious question for the marketing team is – “shouldn’t we try to use the information we have about our players to market our products better?”. The CSR department might instead scratch their heads and ask what should we do with these high-risk players we have identified?

The possible conflict between profit and responsibility does not benefit the concept of responsible gambling. It is necessary that the different departments within the organisation work together.

 

Relate the findings to the real world

Knowledge from different fields is needed when Big Data is interpreted. The information must be related to theories about problematic gambling, gambling addiction but also marketing principles, game design and customer support – if it is to have any meaning.

 

By mapping out the user journeys of your increased risk players, you would know where your responsible gambling efforts seem to have the best effect. For example, maybe there should be a limit on the amount of online scratch-tickets available to some players? Maybe some players shouldn’t be exposed to commercials for high-risk games at all?

 

It is not only about changing risky gambling behaviour – it is about changing the mind-set of a whole industry

There is an increasing need for institutionalised sustainable innovation within the gambling industry, but despite the many technical innovations developed in the field of responsible gambling, there are limits to what we can expect from any digital technology. After all, there are still real humans behind it.  It is not only about using responsible gambling technology; it is about interpretation, cooperation and actions. It is about how you use it.

 

Can responsibility cut it in the tech world? Let us rephrase the first answer into: yes, if we let it. The determining factor of survival in the long-term depends on how successful we are in handling the issues of responsibility and how well we relate the technology to the real word.

Positive first results from Playscan 4

Due to good first page exposure and a marketing campaign on the Operators website we saw an increase in the player activity during the beginning of June. We experienced a jump in activations (the amount of visitors was tripled compared with last year). A lot of non-risk players paid attention to Playscan and activated the tool. The novelty value didn’t scare them off – the tool kept most of the new activations.

 

Positive attitudes

The biggest change between Playscan 4 and previous versions is the players’ own perception of how well the Playscan risk analysis harmonizes with their own believes. The main positive movement of perception is with the increased risk players. 60% of the increased risk players agree with their analysis, something we find very exciting.

The information is useful

With Playscan 4 we have, when communicating with players, added informative texts such as “10 gambling commandments” and “What is gambling addiction?”. 8 out of 10 users appreciate these texts and find them useful.

More completed Self Tests

82% more completed Self Tests, compared with previous 75%. Both these numbers are high and indicate that people don’t mind answering questions about their gambling habits.

 

Increased risk players read informative texts

When a player has read their risk analysis they are given a recommendation based on their risk level. Simply because some tips are more relevant to a risk player than to a non-risk player.

So, what kind of recommendations is appreciated and most clicked? It turns out that increased risk players reads educating texts, such as “to have in mind while gambling”, while at risk players takes action by “setting up a budget”. The non-risk players are more likely to read general information on what problem gambling is and how it is manifested.

Playscan – a system that protects your players

Operators this is your gut-check moment.  Ask yourself, how well is my organization doing in responsible gaming? Is what we are doing best practice? How are others approaching this? Could we be more effective or cost-efficient? How can we improve? What new ideas we should be considering? Are we missing anything? Are we committed to harm reduction in the delivery of our gaming products?

Over the past decade we have seen a significant increase in the commitment to harm minimization by lotteries and gaming organizations around the world.  Thanks to increased commitment by leading gaming organizations and increased monitoring and regulation in most jurisdictions around the world, the principals of responsible gaming are coming to the forefront as part of any gaming organizations product offering.  Proper responsible gaming initiatives are essential to maintaining the public trust and are a cornerstone to the continued success of the gaming industry.

 
That’s why a software solution like Playscan is so important to gaming organizations in their ongoing commitment to enhance RG programs, minimize harm and continue to distinguish themselves from unregulated gaming operators whose motives may be less altruistic.

 

What does Playscan do?

For those who don’t know, Playscan is an industry leading software designed to help gaming operators detect unhealthy gambling among their players – and give them a tool that protects them. Playscan’s analytical system makes player aware of the risk of escalation – the change in actual behavior, feelings and thinking.For the last decade, the commitment to harm minimization has been one of the distinguishing factors between the regulated and unregulated gaming operators around the world.  However, due to increased public awareness of the importance of harm minimization standards, many of the unregulated operators have also begun to implement so-called RG related elements into their product offering.  Once again the lines between regulated and unregulated are being blurred  – leaving players unsure of where they can go to be protected.

 

Understanding gaming behaviors

The foundation for all RG elements in any gaming organization is awareness and understanding.  A key to successful RG programming is the ability for any gaming organization to fully understand the gaming behaviors of their players and the potential impact these behaviors have on each individual throughout the life of their playing relationship.  The key for regulated operators is to use this information to ensure they take the necessary steps to reduce any potential harm for their players.

This is where Playscan can help regulated operators once again take the leadership position in helping to move the responsible gaming bar even higher.
Playscan provides an overall analysis of the players’ gambling behavior and informs each and every player about their individual status.
The Playscan communication aims to raise awareness and seeks afterthought. This motivates not only the player to reflect upon his or her own gambling behavior – but also the gaming operator.

 
Throughout it’s evolution, Playscan is the only solutions provider that has continued to evolve and adapt its programming as the industry continues to introduce new innovations.  And now, Playscan becomes the only RG software solution that has been independently evaluated by a group of RG experts.

 

Playscan – independently evaluated

Playscan reached out to Dr. Richard Wood, Director of GamRes and Dr. Michael Wohl, Director of the Carleton University Gambling Lab (Canada) for an independent review of several key assumptions regarding the impact and affect Playscan has on the playing habits of users.  The 2013 comparative research tracked over 1,500 online players and compared those using Playscan with non-users over the same period.  The definitive results are clear, by using Playscan, gaming operators can reduce harm and provide players with the tools to manage their risk behavior.

 

The independent research highlighted some key facts;

 

•    Playscan users reported feeling significantly better informed about their gambling behavior after using Playscan.

•    Playscan users feel more knowledgeable about responsible gambling and harm minimization  and will increase their use of the available RG players tools.

•    Playscan users show observable changes in their gambling behavior after they receive information from the Playscan system.

•    And perhaps most importantly, the research proves that Playscan helps players to maintain a health risk profile for their gambling behavior.

 

As well, the research provided Playscan with some key recommendations including the implementation of a 6-point risk scale evolving from the traffic light indication previously provided to players.  This provides a more granular communication to the player.

 
Not ones to remain complacent, the Playscan team has already been included this recommendation in the recent release of Playscan 4.
As well, Playscan provides a seamless solution across all platforms including mobile, web and land-based gaming activity, ensuring that players are protected at all entry points into your gaming system.  Another key element is the ability to use Playscan for internal RG training and awareness – a key to deliver responsible products and services at all levels of your gaming organization.

 

With an RG solution like Playscan 4 available to operators around the world, one has to ask why any operator would not consider implementing a system that will  provide a validated harm reduction solution that will also help regulated gaming organizations once again differentiate themselves from the unregulated gaming operators – ensuring a continued confidence by players in their gaming choice.

 

Mike Randall is an independent consultant in the area of Responsible Gaming and Shared-Value.  He was the inaugural chair of the Independent Responsible Gaming Panel with the World Lottery Association.  He is a regular speaker and contributor to responsible gaming discussions around the world.  He can be reached at mike@engageatlantic.ca

Playscan 4.1 is live in Sweden

The Swedish national state-owned lottery Svenska Spel is the first operator that offers the latest version of Playscan to their players. In striving for a healthy gaming market a good gambling experience includes consumer protection. With Playscan 4.1 the players of Svenska Spel now have a world-class tool in their hands.

– Gambling should be a fun activity. The new features presented in the latest version of Playscan makes us confident that gambling stays fun. With Playscan 4.1 we are strengthening our responsible gambling initiatives further and taking new steps towards proactive harm minimization, says Lennart Käll, CEO of Svenska Spel.

New features has been added

With input from gambling addiction support groups and usability research Playscan 4.1 offers, besides the new risk scale, an in-depth-view of the risk analysis. The in-depth detail displays the risk factors that have been found and analyzed in the players gambling data. This design helps the player understand and further reflect on the risks associated with gambling. This design also runs on multiple platforms such as computer, mobile or e-gaming machines.

 

– The in-depth detail offers the players a mirrored image of their own gambling behavior. A very helpful feature if the player wants to understand more about the causes surrounding his or her risk analysis, says Henrik Hallberg, CTO of Playscan.

 

To learn more, pop us an email

 

Responsible gambling-tools in e-gaming machines

There are several ways to help players make responsible decisions when gambling. These ways are gathered under a (pretty big) “responsible gambling”-umbrella. However, this umbrella looks different depending where you are gambling – if you gamble online or in a land-based environment; in your retail store or at your casino. The politics and regulations leaves the gambling industry with a lot of opportunities to decide how that umbrella should appear – so why don’t we grab the chance to make it big enough to actually be responsible?
 
Folding up the responsible gambling umbrella, i.e. taking responsibile gambling seriously, is a lot of hard work for the gaming provider. It includes various actions, such as assenting to the responsible marketing principles, only offer games that has undergone a “responsibility check” and to educate the staff on the ethics of responsible gambling. Another important part under the umbrella is to empower the player to make conscious decisions.
 
That includes offering the player ways to keep control of their gambling e.g. with limit-setting tools. Another example is to inform the player of their risk level and actual gambling behavior with a behavioral tracking tool.
 
We at Playscan would say that this is where the dividing line between online and land-based gambling runs – what kind of RG-tools are offered and in which channel. Yet today there are very few examples of limit-setting or behavioral-tracking tools when it comes to retail or land-based gaming. Why? Is it not possible to provide retail or casino players with these kind of tools? Ofcourse it is possible, but we need to change or at least modify our understandings regarding what land based gaming is – and how it differ itself from online gambling.
 

Change the way we understand “land based gaming”

 
Today it’s possible to provide players with responsible gambling tools, such as risk assessment based on player behavior, due to the fact that the e-gaming machine has experienced technical changes. VLT’s or betting-terminals are not an anonyms sensation anymore. For example, the traceability that’s characteristic for online gambling does often also apply on land based gambling. The operator can centrally automatically monitor every VLT machine. This means that one way of looking at land-based gaming today is that its just another gaming channel where a behavioral tracking tool, like Playscan, works perfectly fine.
 

To provide the player with a weekly risk analysis the solution needs 2 things

playscan2thing
The first thing needed by a behavioural tracking tool, such as Playscan, is gaming data. The information is transferred from the game-provider and analyzed in their Playscan-risk analysis system.
In addition to the gaming data a behavioural tracking system also need to know the identity of the player in order to make a personalized risk assessment.

 

Today, it’s common with some form of player loyalty card when gaming. These cards are used for the purpose of identifying the player. The information is already often used for marketing purposes – and it is the same information that is needed for tools like Playscan to track and assess risky gambling on an individual level.

By combining the gaming data with the identity of players it is possible to inform them when their behavior starts to become risky. This empowers players to make conscious decisions about their gambling, catching developing problems at an early stage.

 

Has this been done anywhere?

 

Lets take a look at Norway. The famous Norwegian VLT story started with an overall inspection of the gambling machine. What is the best way to deal with the machines and control the negative effects?
 
The Norwegian government answered the question in 2007 with a total ban. Though, the second answer was to replace the old machine with new technology, together with a more restrictive distribution. The state-owned gaming provider, Norsk Tipping, introduced a machine that was connected to one central server. Along with a multichannel personalized electronic ID (their mandatory player’s card), the machine could now answer questions like:

What game did you buy, how many tickets, when did you buy and where did you buy? Did you win/loose, how much, on what game and at what date?

Last month Playscan started to analyze data from VLT’s physically standing all around Norway. This added another dimension of knowledge in the understanding of player behavior and the effect of RG-tools.
Players at the Norwegian state lottery Norsk Tipping are now provided with an early warning if their machine-gaming starts to become risky – and this is a big step forward towards the goal to offer RG-tools in the land-based gaming environment.

 

The bottom line

 

The bottom line here is to bring principles of what we have learned from gambling online – to gambling in retail stores, betting shops and into the casinos. The channels don’t differ in any dramatical way anymore – and as new technologies are introduced, responsible gambling can adapt and reach a wider audience.

How to successfully launch responsibility at a gambling site

Playscan is a responsible gambling solution. When it is active and live at a gambling site it’s surrounded by sparkling and attractive games. Playscan is not the primarily utility of the site, that’s a fact. However, Playscan is a necessary part because it offers the player control: it provides information on gambling behavior.
The challenge is not always to convince a user to activate Playscan. It’s also to convince the operator to share the story of responsibility: to simply display and market the responsible gambling-section of the website and responsible gambling-tools.

 

Our costumers are always our story and this article describes the strategy and lessons learned form our recent installation at Norsk Tipping in Norway.

 

What to consider before a launch?

utvecklingsprocess2.001

When implementing a whole new RG-section and a new RG-tool it’s important to understand and clarify the motives behind the decision. If not, you can’t really understand the “aftermaths”. However, a bit contradictive – the motive and strategy will probably change over time when knowledge about player behavior is being communicated and processed within the organization. In the startup-phase questions like “why are we doing this?”, “what results do we expect?” and “how will this affect the overall business?”, need to be discussed in order to work in a proactive way: to constantly raise the bar.

 

Another question, closely associated with the overall strategy is whether offering Playscan as a voluntary or a mandatory tool. A mandatory usage of Playscan means that the operator is communicating with all their players that have a risky gambling behavior. However, a common initial approach is to offer Playscan on a voluntary basis, just as Norsk Tipping did. When doing that it’s important to understand the different player segments.

That is key to further understanding the distinctive needs the players have. Prior to launch, Per Einar Karlsen, Responsible Gambling Advisor at Norsk Tipping, and his team defined target groups. One of those was “new customers” who wanted to try out new games that were available. Another target group was the “high spenders”. These designated segments helped the operator direct their efforts and strategically plan their activities.

 

 

When planning turns into action

 

The same day Norsk Tipping launched new games at their gambling site – they also launched Playscan. At the launch day Norsk Tipping communicated “responsibility before profit” in their press release to all their stakeholders:
“Norsk Tipping wants to offer attractive games to their players. However, it should be offered with sobriety and not encourage problematic gambling behaviors. Therefore, Norsk Tipping introduces several tools, for example Playscan and the limit setting tool all players must use, that will help the player make conscious choices.”
The players got introduced not only to new games but furthermore to a whole new RG-section at the gambling site. No less than 4000 players activated Playscan during its day of launch. Per Einar explains why responsible gambling was a central part of their launch:

 

“It was important for us to connect and to reach out with the message of responsibility to old and new costumers, both via web and the mobile channel when we launched these new types of games. “

 

Per Einar explains: “Information overload is always something to respect and consider in every marketing activity. Since the registration-process is quite a procedure, a challenge was to also market Playscan without overwhelming the player.”

 

After registering at the gambling site, the new costumer got a message from Norsk Tipping in which they were encouraged to check out Playscan. As many as 13% of all the players who tried out the new games also activated Playscan.

 

 

Per Einar continues:

“We are now noticing that a great portion of the players that decided to activate Playscan are the ones that really need it – the high risk gamblers. And this is what we hoped for. The success is about knowing that these players are using the tool. Over time, it will be a success to see these players lower their risk scores.”

 

The players that haven’t activated Playscan are getting a reminder of their option to do so every three months. Norsk Tipping will continuously evaluate this strategy: what kind of player is using the tool? Are we targeting the “right” ones? If not, how do we adjust our strategy?

 

“Direct marketing with the theme of responsible gambling, based on our designated player segments, is the way forward for us. We want to establish a dialogue with players, especially the vulnerable ones. Playscan is a helpful tool for that”, Per Einar explains.

 

The risk analysis that Playscan provides is only possible if the player’s gambling data is registered. By using a multichannel personalized electronic ID (Norsk Tipping’s mandatory player’s card), Norsk Tipping is unique in providing player data of all player activities. This gives the opportunity to also include the gambling activities that take place at the retail stores. Moving forward, Playscan and Norsk Tipping are implementing a retail solution.

 

A process of innovation ahead: Setting the goal of being a responsible gambling provider is easy, the tricky part is to actually act in a responsible way – and most of all, getting your players to feel it. In this process it’s clear that when Norsk Tipping connected their players with new games, they also connected them with new RG-solutions.

 

“Today we position ourselves as a responsible gaming provider and we intend to keep that position. How do we get even better? That is the challenging, but important, question ahead”

 

It’s also about the non-actions: Norsk Tipping do not send sales-oriented marketing to a player that is showing signs of risky gambling behavior.

 

Lessons learned from Norsk Tipping so far tell us that launching responsibility requires both a portion of planning and a portion of faith: faith that their players understand the good in using RG-tools, if they are offered. Most players make wise and rational decisions.

Raising the bar

Not long ago I visited the yearly forum on gambling addiction held by NGOs and support groups around Sweden, Norway and Denmark. When listening to the speakers presenting the latest findings and research about problematic gambling and gambling addiction, I was left with the thought: gambling addiction should not be about politics.

Gambling addiction is a psychiatric diagnosis that belongs to the group of ‘addictive disorders’ (as stated in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, known as DSM5). Gambling addiction is classified as a nonsubstance disorder and what’s clear is that a person afflicted with this disorder really suffers. Like other similar addictive disorders, such as alcoholism, it is not only the person suffering the disorder that is affected. It also brings harm to his or her friends and family.

 

Recent figures from a Swedish longitudinal gambling study show that 75,000 children live with someone who has a gambling problem. For such a small country, that is a high figure.

 

It’s easy to close our eyes and wish that the problem would go away. It’s even easier to point our fingers at others. But the problem won’t go away, because gambling addiction is a real problem and it affects real people. The fact is that the gambling arena is expanding.

It is getting more intense and games are getting more accessible. We get exposed to gambling more and more. A recent study from England, written by Ofcom (independent regulator and competition authority for the UK communications industries), show that 4% of all TV commercials are advertisements for gambling. On an average, a child is exposed to four gambling advertisements per week.

 

The debate is focusing a lot on finding the one “who is responsible” and “the owner of the problem”. Well, that one person does not exist. The discourse about gambling and gambling related problems includes a lot of stakeholders, such as operators, regulators, politicians, the healthcare sector, social services, and of course: the players. Since we do know a great deal of what the risk factors of developing problems are – let’s make sense of that knowledge and take full responsibility ourselves.

 

The gambling industry must focus on how they can contribute to harm minimisation – and decrease the possibility that their players develop gambling problems. How data analytics can be used to promote harm minimisation is the question. The science of psychology is trying to describe how humans behave – and then try to understand the reasons for that behaviour. It works in that order, first we need to visualise how people behave before we can understand them. Maybe the gaming industry could learn something from that?

 

A responsible gaming operator needs to have knowledge about the risk status of their players in order to act in a responsible way. For example, statistically unhealthy gamblers make up around 2% of the adult population. One question to ask is: how much of the operators revenue do they stand for? Data analytics and especially behavioural tracking tools are one way of getting that knowledge.

 

These tools find order in seemingly unstructured data and they measure the risk of developing problems. For the gaming provider, data analytics of gambling behaviour can provide intelligence about their player population and, as a consequence, find ways to act to minimise risk. This is a good thing not only for the player but also from a business standpoint since an unhealthy player is a viable risk, they are volatile and a possible ticking bomb of bad PR.

 

Sharing the information – gathered through the use of a behavioural tracking tool – is a good way for the gaming operators to act. This educates not only the player on how to avoid getting into trouble (and behave in irrational ways that affect their life by jeopardising relationships, education and their jobs). It also enables the player to make an informed choice about their gambling.

 

That same information could also be used for harm minimisation in a greater sense. If data, knowledge and information are shared with other parties within the gambling sector (regulators, academia and researchers, help lines and treatment centres) the sharing party will not only receive great PR, but the idea of what responsible gambling really is can be taken to a whole new level.

 

However, dogmatic minds must be left behind. Reflecting on how new research and tools can improve responsible gambling is a preferable approach.

 

When we talk to responsible operators who offer these kind of tools to their players they say: “There is not one thing that will work on its own – it’s the overall effort”. And that is the thing. There isn’t one single thing, one person or one actor in this industry that can solve the problem. The responsibility of solving it must be shared, but describing and understanding the problem is a good start. Sharing that knowledge and taking a cooperative responsibility is the beginning of raising responsible gambling to another level.

Responsible Gaming

John LuffResponsibly has never been more “hot” as a topic and the gaming/gambling sector is no exception. Not only is it vital that we protect our players – it is equally important that the reputation and integrity of our organisations remain intact.

In the past responsibility was too often regarded as “worthy” – something to support/embrace because an organisation could or worse, because they could not avoid it for regulatory/legal reasons. Now it is a business necessity. Responsibility simply makes good business sense.

Founder of UK based Sustainable Marketing and World Lottery Association Responsible Gaming Independent Assessment Panel member John Luff explains why.

 

 

Responsible gambling embraces employee and retailer training, player education, treatment referral, marketing, game design….indeed the whole of an organisation’s attitude and approach.

So why does responsibility make business sense?

Every organisation is unique, and so the reasons for pursuing responsible business practices will vary for each organisation. However, these five key reasons remain constant:

  • Gaining regulatory acceptance
  • Increasing brand loyalty
  • Fostering employee emotional commitment
  • Winning supplier, partner, and distributor support
  • Improving organisational performance

 

 

Go beyond compliance

Regulators want independent, professional and transparent evidence that a gambling operator has the structures, processes, strategies, and overall culture that will best serve citizens in the regulators’ jurisdictions.

Nowhere is the regulator’s concern more focused than in the area of responsible gambling. Indeed, while operators may raise money for good causes as well as paying taxes, providing employment and contributing to society and the economy in other ways, the means are just as important as the end.

One of the principal precepts of medical ethics, “First, do no harm”, is as relevant today to the gambling sector as it is to the medical sector. Regulators worldwide are waking up to the effects of gambling related-problems on society and their job is growing in scope, size, and complexity. They are looking for proof positive that operators are doing their part to address gambling-related problems and those operators are striving to protect their communities from gambling-related harms.

All successful operators know that compliance is increasingly becoming an entry-level requirement. They realise that in presenting their case, they need to go beyond proving mere compliance.

Compliance will get you to the starting blocks, but it will not help you win the race.

This is especially relevant for gambling operators that face strong competition within their jurisdictions or are applying for licenses outside their jurisdictions. Not only does providing proof positive evidence of responsible structures, processes and strategies strengthen your business case – it serves as proof positive that you have taken your organisation beyond mere compliance. Today, if you want to be in business you have to demonstrate that you embrace responsible business.

 

 

The golden rule of marketing- trust equals brand loyalty

Today choice is increasing in all markets and sectors. But in no sector is it expanding as fast as in the gaming and gambling sector. Within the space of a few years it has moved from restricted player choice to the point where player choice is virtually exploding. Expanded player choice has been generated by the emergence of new suppliers, new products, new technologies, and new marketing strategies. It has been further enhanced by open legislation, trans-border possibilities, and convenient access to gaming/gambling platforms.

 

When consumers are confused or overloaded with choice, they turn to brands that they trust. Hence, as choice increases, so does the importance of your brand. This golden rule of marketing holds especially true in our increasingly global market. Players will remain loyal to and recommend the brands that are seen to have the players’ best interests at heart.

But it is not just about customer numbers; it is about maintaining good relationships with the right kind of customers. A good reputation for responsible gambling will help a lottery to attract the right kind of customer, and to retain a responsible, constant, and steady customer base. A good reputation can actually extend your customer base. Potential customers that may initially be put off from gambling are more likely to give a reputable operator a try. Perhaps most importantly, it is easier in any sector to retain a customer than it is to win back a lost customer. Nothing loses a customer more quickly than loss of trust.

In this context, responsibility contributes powerfully to the marketing mix. A responsible approach to business and to gambling in particular can be promoted via above-the-line marketing, through your social media presence, and in your lobbying activities. It is an important tool in getting your message across to such customer-influencing elements as the news media and consumer advocacy groups.

 

 

Employee commitment: Winning hearts and minds

An organisation cannot prosper without the faith and support of its members. It should permeate every aspect of the organisation – from the highest levels of corporate governance, down to the people that sell the products and how they are sold. There can be no more concrete evidence of an organisation’s true culture and commitment than its approach to responsible gambling.

Knowledge that your organisation has a world-class approach to responsible gambling evokes an employee’s emotional commitment and fosters pride throughout the organisation. Employees will be more likely to stand behind their organisation, work harder for it, contribute to its success, be more creative in promoting it, and – most importantly – endorse it outside the workplace, if they are proud to associate themselves with it. “You can’t sell it outside if you can’t sell it inside” may be a cliché. But it is a cliché for a good reason – it’s true.

 

 

Business partner and other stakeholder support

No organisation works in a vacuum. All organisations need suppliers, distributors, and other business partners for an ever-increasing variety of reasons. These business partners have a choice: whether to work with you or not. If so, how enthusiastically do they want to work with you and with what level of endorsement? Do they even want their brand or their business to be associated with you?

What applies to your customers and your employees, applies to your business partners as well. The same holds for other stakeholders, such as community groups, academic institutions, research bodies, and lobbyists. They all need to know that your organisation is reputable and can be trusted. They need to believe – indeed to know – that an organisation’s responsible gambling practices are reputable, trustworthy, and best-in-class.

 

 

The path to improved performance

All organisations – in their commitment to responsible gambling – will want to know the answers to the following questions:

  • How well are we doing compared to others – in our sector and outside?
  • Is our responsible gaming programme on a path of continuous improvement?
  • Is what we are doing best practice?
  • Could we do what we are doing more effectively, more efficiently, and more economically?
  • Are there any new ideas with regard to responsible gambling that we should be considering?
  • Do we have the best possible responsible gambling measures, structures, and processes in place?

 

Although internal audits and formal management accounting reviews will touch on all of these questions, an external responsibility audit can help the applicant clarify the answers to all of these questions through its precise structuring. Indeed, commitment to responsibility by its nature requires some form of external validation by a recognised and reputable agent.

The audit should embrace global standards, yet allow for cultural and regional differences. Individual national and regional forms of accreditation do exist, and many of them are excellent. But we live in a world where brand awareness has gone global, owing in large part to the “always on” nature of today’s technology. As a result, all stakeholders increasingly expect organisations to measure themselves against global standards.

The evidence required for responsibility relates to the day-to-day management of an organisation. Nothing is requested that should not be readily available as part of the organisation’s daily business. Therefore no extra costs or resources should be entailed by having to gather additional information or data to meet an external audit.

A responsibility audit should be designed to complement and improve the safeguards that individual operators already have in place – not meant to replace them. Similarly, it should not compromise regional, national, or international regulatory compliance nor should it conflict with professional requirements. They should, however, allow organisations to showcase their steps toward compliance and prove how their responsible gambling programmes go above and beyond compliance.

 

Conclusion – layers, guns and money

Of course, you do not have to choose responsibility. There is always a choice. But in my view the only choices are embrace, celebrate and communicate your organisation’s commitment to responsibility or in the words of Warren Zevon be prepared to send for “lawyers, guns and money”. Please put aside the guns but in an age of social media enabling transparency at the speed of light if you are anything less than responsible you will need the money and lawyers.

 

John Luff

www.sustainablemarketing.co.uk

 

 

 

Playscan in partnership with National Council on Problem Gambling North America

Playscan and National Council on Problem Gambling US has entered into a partnership agreement to ensure that players will receive North American specific responsible gambling information directly within the Playscan system.

As gaming operators in the US move forward with launching their online gaming channels, it is vitally important to ensure that the player population is fully informed about the risks associated with gambling.
The partnership with the National Council on Problem Gambling (NCPG) ensures that all players utilising the Playscan system both online and land-based in the USA will find localised information about problematic gambling. The player will have direct access to National Helpline numbers – when needed the most.

 

About
The National Council on Problem Gambling is the national advocate for programs and services to assist problem gamblers and their families. The mission of the NCPG is to increase public awareness of pathological gambling, ensure the widespread availability of treatment for problem gamblers and their families, and to encourage research and programs for prevention and education.

Playscan now live at Norsk Tipping

The Norwegian national lottery, Norsk Tipping is the first operator to use Playscan on VLT’s as well as on all their old and new online-games. The player can access Playscan through both web and mobile. This takes consumer protection to the next level.

Launching the first VLT module and releasing Playscan in multiple channels, Norsk Tipping is at the forefront of responsible gambling. By using an multichannel personalized electronic ID (their mandatory player’s card), Norsk Tipping is unique in providing player data of all player activities and gives Playscan the perfect foundation to become the hub for all proactive responsible gambling activities.

 

By providing an informed choice early in the gambling experience, Norsk Tipping gets an opportunity to create a sustainable relationship with their customers. With Playscan they are able to provide players with a risk analysis based on their player behavior.

–       Responsible gambling has always been an important issue for Norsk Tipping. We are proud to be the first operator to analyze gaming data via Playscan for our players, says Torbjörn Almlid, CEO of Norsk Tipping.

 

In addition to the implementation of Playscan there has been a focus on the importance of reaching out to the player and the organization regarding how to communicate and understand the effects and knowledge that you can gain from Playscan. Torbjörn Almlid continues:

–       The Playscan team is highly professional, not only regarding the system but has also provided us with great knowledge regarding future communication and education on responsible Gambling.

 

The next step will be to continue the collaboration and expand the strategy to create a more sustainable and responsible gambling environment for the Norwegian players.

–       We are delighted to work with Norsk Tipping, a company that takes responsible gambling extremely seriously. By implementing Playscan and in their vision of the next step for Playscan, they really show their commitment to their player’s wellbeing, says Andreas Holmström, CEO of Playscan AB.

To learn more, pop us an email

Playscan 4

Playscan 4

Our product has been evaluated, tested and now also – twisted. We are very proud to announce the latest, the next: Playscan 4

 

– Playscan 4 is about communication; with players, with operators, with regulators in all channels. We build on years of experience and player feedback to make our information even more accessible, says Andreas Holmström CEO of Playscan.

 

Playscan has become known for its traffic light analogy when communicating with the players. We changed this into a scale of risk. With a six point scale Playscan is more granular and more precise. This enables the player to understand the gradual changes in their behavior.  Playscan is now better framed to visualize the process of escalating gambling risk.

 

Playscan 4 is also equipped with improved customized (and smarter) recommendations to each player. These are now based on the specific game the player is playing – instead of an overall assessment.

 

Playscan is now a seamless experience across multiple gaming channels and it’s feature proofed for possible mandatory usage. Another new feature on Playscan 4 is the customization. When looking after your players, your brand should be the focus, not ours. We have made it simple for operators to customize Playscan and make it more adaptable to their specific brand and feel on the gambling site.

 

– Playscan 4 is an exciting continuation of the Playscan saga. By learning from all of our installations of Playscan 3 and the 100 million analyses performed in the series, we’ve made the good parts better, clarified what needed clarification and added a couple of extremely promising features, says Henrik Hallberg CTO of Playscan.

 

The Playscan Newsletter

Keep yourself up to date  with our newsletter!

Playscan Newsletter October 2014

  • Players benefit from using Playscan
  • What questions do we get about Playscan?

 

Playscan Newsletter September 2014

  • The importance of visibility in player communication
  • Putting a face on the increased risk player

 

Playscan Newsletter August 2014

  • First results from Playscan 4

 

Playscan Newsletter June 2014

  • Make sense of big data

 

Playscan Newsletter May 2014

  • Playscan 4.1 is live in Sweden
  • PLAYSCAN – a system that protects your players

 

Playscan Newsletter April 2014

  • Is responsible gambling still a hot topic?
  • The new Playscan movie!

 

Playscan Newsletter March 2014

  • Responsible gambling tools in e-gaming machines
  • Newsletter survey

 

Playscan Newsletter February 2014

  • How to successfully launch responsibility at a gambling site
  • Raising the bar

Playscan Newsletter January 2014

  • Playscan is live in Norway
  • Guest Article by John Luff – Responsible Gaming : The Business Case

 

Playscan Newsletter December 2013

  • What 2013 meant to Playscan

 

Playscan Newsletter November 2013

  •  Playscan and GamCare sign Letter Of Intent
  • Youth addiction prevention program spreads among many lotteries

 

Playscan Newsletter October 2013

  •  Playscan – the subject of a newly started PhD dissertation
  • Atlantic Lottery builds employee commitment through their CSR certification program

 

Playscan Newsletter September 2013

  • High risk gamblers more interested in their behaviours
  • Welcome to the team, Emil Hellman!

 

Playscan Newsletter August 2013

  • The Playscan Team is back!
  • Guest Article by Keith Whyte  – “The power of technology”

 

 Newsletter June 2013

  • Key events this spring – Happy summer!

 

Newsletter May 2013

  • Launch of Playscan™ 3.7
  • Playscan AB – a WLA associated member

 

Playscan Newsletter April 2013

  • CEO Andreas Holmström to speak at The International Conference on Gambling & Risk Taking in Las Vegas, May 27-31, 2013
  • How to be successful with a technical solution

 

Playscan Newsletter March 2013

  • Playscan CEO Andreas Holmström to speak at Responsible Gambling Council Discovery 2013 Conference
  • Guest Article by Magnus Rydeving “What is Responsible Gambling?”

 

Playscan Newsletter February 2013

  • Playscan AB appoints new CEO
  • Guest Article by Mike Randall “No time to rest on your laurels”

 

Playscan Newsletter January 2013

  • Dr Richard Wood commences the evaluation of Playscan™
  • Playscan welcomes two new members to its team

 

Playscan Newsletter December 2012

  • Norsk Tipping signs Playscan™ as their Responsible Gambling soultion
  • Playscan™ – how it works (part II)

 

Playscan Newsletter November 2012

  • Playscan™ – how it works

 

Playscan Newsletter October 2012

  • Playscan Retail™

 

Playscan Newsletter September 2012

  • Kombispel launches online games where Playscan is available from day one
  • Playscan exhibiting at The World Lottery Summit in Montréal, Canada

 

Playscan Newsletter July/August 2012

  • Playscan live at RAY.fi

 

Playscan Newsletter June 2012

  • Playscan Insight™

 

Playscan Newsletter May 2012

  • Playscan Develops Land-Based Responsible Gambling App

 

Playscan Newsletter April 2012

  • Playscan welcomes you to the Sustainable Gambling Blog.
  • Playscan attending the GIGSE conference in San Francisco.

 

Playscan Newsletter Mars 2012

  • Playscan Attends the Discovery Conference 2012.
  • Playscan becomes member of the SACC.

 

Playscan Newsletter February 2012

  • Svenska Spel Rebrands Spelkoll to Playscan.
  • Playscan receives WLA certification.

 

Playscan Newsletter January 2012

  • Playscan attending ICE 2012.